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LANDSLIDES IN A RURAL MOUNTAINOUS REGION: DAMAGING AND RESOURCE-FORMING IMPACTS (SOUTH CAUCASUS, GEORGIA)

https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2011-4-1-59-68

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Abstract

Catastrophic loss of soils and slope sediments by landslides causes destruction of mountainous environment and outflow of population from affected areas. However, the role of landslides in mountainous regions goes beyond direct destructive activity. The sliding mass expose surfaces for weathering and accumulate loose mineral material, the vital resource for mountain biota and population thus starting new cycles in ecosystems development, forming new habitats for biota and, in some cases, new lands for farming. A chronological sequence of landslides and their adaptation for human needs was studied in Adjara province, the South Caucasus mountainous region, Georgia. As a rule, in 15 years, a thin and compacted soil layer is formed on low and mound surface of a landslide. In 30 years, people start recultivation of the landslide area. After 40–60 years, the landslide area is used as a hayfield. It usually takes 100 years to transform the area into a fully cultivated landscape typical of Mountainous Adjara.

About the Authors

Raisa Gracheva

Russian Federation
Institute of Geography of RAS, Staromonetny per. 29 Moscow 119017 Russia


Tengiz Urushadze

Georgia
Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, 3 Ilia Chavchavadze Ave. 0128 Tbilisi, Georgia


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For citation:


Gracheva R., Urushadze T. LANDSLIDES IN A RURAL MOUNTAINOUS REGION: DAMAGING AND RESOURCE-FORMING IMPACTS (SOUTH CAUCASUS, GEORGIA). GEOGRAPHY, ENVIRONMENT, SUSTAINABILITY. 2011;4(1):59-68. https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2011-4-1-59-68

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