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DRINKING WATER, SANITATION AND HEALTH IN KOLKATA METROPOLITAN CITY: CONTRIBUTION TOWARDS URBAN SUSTAINABILITY

https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2015-8-4-64-81

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Abstract

In an urban area, the water is supplied through centralised municipal tap water system. For the present enquiry, the municipal supply of water for drinking and sanitation purposes has been assessed in terms of its availability and accessibility to the people, possible sources of water contamination and related health issues in Kolkata. The relevant data have been accessed from various secondary sources where the published data from West Bengal Pollution Control Board (WBPCB) and Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) are noteworthy. The data thus obtained have been assessed qualitatively to depict the ground reality on sanitation and health related issues. The analyses of the data reveal that in Kolkata, the availability of good quality drinking water is not sufficient as the supply is low and inadequate. On the other hand, the underground water which is considered as the alternative source to the people is found to be contaminated with heavy metals like arsenic and lead. The non-availability of sufficient
water for drinking and sanitation purposes and consumption of contaminated water may
result into poor health condition with various water borne diseases. The data on diseases from dispensaries (aided by KMC) in Kolkata has revealed that people with water borne diseases are significant in number where they are found to be affected with diseases like Acute Diarrhoeal Infection and Dysenteries. Some suitable measures have been proposed whereby applying those, the availability and accessibility of water for drinking and proper sanitation could be enhanced and the occurrences of diseases might be avoided.

About the Authors

R. B. Singh
Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
India
Department of Geography


Md. Senaul Haque
Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi
India
Department of Geography


Aakriti Grover
Swami Shraddhanand College, University of Delhi
India
Department of Geography


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For citation:


Singh R.B., Haque M.S., Grover A. DRINKING WATER, SANITATION AND HEALTH IN KOLKATA METROPOLITAN CITY: CONTRIBUTION TOWARDS URBAN SUSTAINABILITY. GEOGRAPHY, ENVIRONMENT, SUSTAINABILITY. 2015;8(4):64-81. https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2015-8-4-64-81

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