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SPATIAL ANALYSIS ON HEALTH PROBLEMS AMONG UNORGANIZED INDUSTRIAL WORKERS IN AMBEDKARNAGAR DISTRICT, INDIA

https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2017-10-3-87-98

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Abstract

Health status is one of the important indicators for the welfare of people. People working in unorganized sector are exploited in terms of working hours, low and irregular income, unsatisfactory work conditions, no legal protection and exposed to occupational health hazards. Present study aims to analyze a spatial dimension of occupational health outcomes among the cottage industry workers and their socioeconomic conditions. Based on field survey, the result shows that there is an association between different categories of industries and various health problems which leads respiratory and muscular problem, skin disease, and stress and sleep disturbances. There should be a strong provision for occupational health services, carrying out activities in the work place in the aim of protecting and promoting worker’s safety, health and well-being.

About the Authors

M. Anjum
Aligarh Muslim University
India

Post Doctoral Fellow, Department of Geography, 

Aligarh-202002



N. Khan
Aligarh Muslim University
India

Honorary Professor,  Department of Geography,

Aligarh-202002



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For citation:


Anjum M., Khan N. SPATIAL ANALYSIS ON HEALTH PROBLEMS AMONG UNORGANIZED INDUSTRIAL WORKERS IN AMBEDKARNAGAR DISTRICT, INDIA. GEOGRAPHY, ENVIRONMENT, SUSTAINABILITY. 2017;10(3):87-98. https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2017-10-3-87-98

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ISSN 2071-9388 (Print)
ISSN 2542-1565 (Online)