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TRAGEDY OF CLIMATE AGREEMENTS IN POST-KYOTO PHASE: COPENHAGEN AND BEYOND

https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2017-10-3-54-65

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Abstract

Climate change is a global environmental problem that is caused due to human-induced increasing levels of the Greenhouse Gases (GHGs). The consequences of climate change are so severe that no country is immune from it. The problem of climate change has created a profound dilemma. There is no global treaty on climate change that can effectively reduce GHGs emission, fix the responsibilities and recompense damages caused to the environment. However, the contentious issue is: To what extent the developed countries should assist the poor countries in meeting the cost of adaptation? The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has emphasized on assisting poor and the most vulnerable developing countries. During the Copenhagen Climate Change Conference, various countries adopted Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to stabilize their emissions of the GHGs. The key intention behind this collective action was to limit the level of temperature below 2oC over pre-industrial level in coming years. But mere pledges are not enough. In fact, more effective measures are needed to cope with rising global temperature. Moreover, significant changes are required in existing climate change policies and programmes. The United Nations (UN) emphasized the principle of Common but Differentiated Responsibility at the Kyoto, Bali, and Copenhagen conferences but the biggest contributors have refused to accept and abide by this principle. At the same time, things are not quite simple as limitation on CO2 mean limitations on economic growth. This has made climate negotiations a very contentious political issue as a result of which the very object of the UN to limit GHG emissions have turned into a tug of war. There is no serious political will to support climate change endeavours. Hundreds of measures have been negotiated in this direction, yet, most of these face problem of implementation. We should act efficiently and quickly to adapt to adverse consequences as projected by the Intergovernmental panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The effective mitigation measures must be taken, worldwide, to tackle climate change urgently. The time is running out. The climate change is the greatest challenge that requires immediate solution. The present paper critically analyses progress made in the field of climate change in the post-Kyoto period and provides to what extent treaties, like, Copenhagen Accord has been successful in dealing with climate change. The work of paper is primarily based on analytical and empirical approach. The significance of the study lies in the fact that climate change is a burning phenomena that the world community facing today. In fact, its solution is required. In this paper authors argue that no country in an isolated manner can cope with the problem of climatic change. In fact, global efforts based on cooperation of all states are very important.

About the Author

Dr. Reena
Aligarh Muslim University
India

Political Science Department,

Aligarh



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For citation:


Reena D. TRAGEDY OF CLIMATE AGREEMENTS IN POST-KYOTO PHASE: COPENHAGEN AND BEYOND. GEOGRAPHY, ENVIRONMENT, SUSTAINABILITY. 2017;10(3):54-65. https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2017-10-3-54-65

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