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INDIGENOUS AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT FOR SUSTAINABILITY AND “SATOYAMA”

https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2014-7-2-86-95

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Abstract

Satoyama is a Japanese term for landscapes that comprise a mosaic of different ecosystems which include forests, agricultural lands, grassland irrigation ponds and human settlements aimed at promoting viable human nature interaction. The Japanese government is seeking to revitalize it locally and promote it internationally, receiving accreditation as UNESCO Satoyama Initiatives. Here we explore the dynamics of this system and how it can be used as a model for any intended agricultural development in indigenous communities globally. In this paper we strongly address sustainable agriculture development which takes into consideration the local culture and traditions which exists.

About the Authors

Devon R. Dublin
Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University
Russian Federation


Noriyuki Tanaka
Center for Sustainability Science (CENSUS), Hokkaido University
Russian Federation


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For citation:


Dublin D.R., Tanaka N. INDIGENOUS AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT FOR SUSTAINABILITY AND “SATOYAMA”. GEOGRAPHY, ENVIRONMENT, SUSTAINABILITY. 2014;7(2):86-95. https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2014-7-2-86-95

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ISSN 2071-9388 (Print)
ISSN 2542-1565 (Online)