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APPLICATION OF HYPERSPECTURAL IMAGES AND GROUND DATA FOR PRECISION FARMING

https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2017-10-4-117-128

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Abstract

Crops, like other plants, clearly react to various changes in both natural and anthropogenic factors (herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers, etc.), which affects the amount of phytomass, its fractional composition, and developmental and physiological state of the plant, and, accordingly, is reflected in the spectral image. Data on spectral characteristics of plants allow users to determine quickly and with a high degree of reliability various indicators of the state of agricultural crops and thus improve the efficiency of agrotechnical practices and the use of land resources and facilitate the implementation of the precision farming concept. Reflective properties of plants (and hence crops) carry a large amount of meaningful information about the species, stage of development, and morpho-physiological state, allowing determination of the interrelations between the spectrometric characteristics and temporal physiological parameters. The paper presents the results of monitoring of the state of winter wheat and corn in experimental fields in southern and central Russia in the spring and summer of 2016.

 

About the Authors

Y. Akhtman
Geodetic Engineering Laboratory of École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland
Switzerland
Ph.D., is Research Associate at the Geodetic Engineering Laboratory of École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)


E. Golubeva
M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University
Russian Federation
Professor of the Environmental Science Department and Head of Education Programs “Ecology and Environmental Science” and “Landscape Planning and Design” at the Faculty of Geography, Lomonosov Moscow State University (1974 – M.Sc. in Biogeography, 1982 – Ph.D. in Biogeography, 1999 – D. Sc. in Biology)


O. Tutubalina
M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University
Russian Federation
Leading Researcher at the Laboratory of Aerospace Methods, Department of Cartography and Geoinformatics, Faculty of Geography


M. Zimin
M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University
Russian Federation
Senior Researcher at the Laboratory of Aerospace Methods, Department of Cartography and Geoinformatics, Faculty of Geography, M.V. Lomonosov State University. He graduated from the Faculty of Geography in 2001 (M.Sc. Cartography and GIS) and then received Ph.D. in Cartography and GIS (2009


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For citation:


Akhtman Y., Golubeva E., Tutubalina O., Zimin M. APPLICATION OF HYPERSPECTURAL IMAGES AND GROUND DATA FOR PRECISION FARMING. GEOGRAPHY, ENVIRONMENT, SUSTAINABILITY. 2017;10(4):117-128. https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2017-10-4-117-128

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ISSN 2071-9388 (Print)
ISSN 2542-1565 (Online)