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GEOGRAPHIC PATTERNS IN THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2017-10-1-78-84

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Abstract

This article aims to develop some concept on new economic geography. The authors presented a case study of a newborn carmaker that applies an innovative business model in auto industry. The current business environment is analyzed, problems of sustainability discussed, and a new business model proposed.

About the Author

Graziella Ferrara
Suor Orsola Benincasa of Naples
Russian Federation

Professor of Economic Geography at Suor Orsola Benincasa of Naples. She was visiting researcher at Salem State College (USA). Her research interests concern geography, internationalization and corporate strategy. She published many articles on geography, internationalization and corporate strategy and she is in the editorial board of many relevant journals



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For citation:


Ferrara G. GEOGRAPHIC PATTERNS IN THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY. GEOGRAPHY, ENVIRONMENT, SUSTAINABILITY. 2017;10(1):78-84. https://doi.org/10.24057/2071-9388-2017-10-1-78-84

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ISSN 2071-9388 (Print)
ISSN 2542-1565 (Online)